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HBD5722

Course Guide for Developing Human Potential - HBD5722

Peer Reviewed Journals

 

 

WHAT ARE “PEER-REVIEWED” JOURNALS?

 

 

A SERIAL is any publication that is issued in successive parts, usually (though not always) at regular intervals, and is intended to be continued indefinitely. Serials include: periodicals, newspapers, magazines, annuals, yearbooks, journals, memoirs, proceedings, transactions, and numbered monographic series.

 

 

 

A PERIODICAL is a serial published indefinitely at regular or stated intervals, generally more frequently than once a year. Each issue is numbered and/or dated consecutively and contains articles, stories, or other writing. Journals, magazines and newspapers are periodicals.

 

 

 

There is a difference between magazines and journals

 

 

 

A MAGAZINE is a periodical, generally with a more “popular” style and presentation than a research journal. Usually, magazine articles are authored by staff writers for an audience of the general public or interested amateurs in a given field (rather than by researchers for their peers), and edited by a magazine employee rather than an independent board of scholars. Style tends to be engaging and eye-catching, and magazines often include substantial advertising. Pagination usually starts over at “1” with each issue.

 

 

 

A JOURNAL is a periodical publication in which researchers report the results of their work to their peer community. Articles are reviewed by an editorial board of scholars in the field prior to acceptance for publication, and generally include an abstract and numerous citations to previous work. The writing style in journals is formal rather than engaging, and journals generally have little or no advertising or glossy, catchy graphics and illustrations. Journals often have pages numbered continuously through the several issues of a given volume (for example, v.15 #1 has pages 1-223; v.15 #2 runs from p.224-587, and so forth to the last issue of the volume).

 

 

 

PEER REVIEW is a process that articles in many journals go through before they are published. Once an article is submitted for publication, it is sent to an editorial board comprised of experts in the field to be evaluated. The submitted article must receive the approval of the editorial board before it is published. The editorial board is usually identified at the beginning of each issue of a journal.